Staglieno Cemetery: Where Death Is Beautiful

Staglieno’s cemetery represents more than the dead. It represents a confluence of movements that advance the cause of life. The Cimitero Monumental di Stagliano—as it is called—sits on a quaint hill in the Stagliano district of Genoa, Italy, with beauty wrapped around the memory of death like a wreath of hope. A cemetery is not what you think of when you think of a tourist destination, but this burial site has attracted visitors from all over the world for its monumental sculptures and breathtaking architecture.

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

The concept of Staglieno cemetery dates back to 1804, when Napoleon introduced the Edict of St. It forbade the burial of the dead in churches and cellars. In turn, cemeteries made their way into the urban landscape. But by 1835, a cholera epidemic was producing corpses from the mound, and that was when plans for a grand cemetery on the outskirts of the city were approved. It was designed by the city’s famous architect Carlo Barabino. However, the pandemic got the best of him, and the project was soon taken over by his disciple Giovanni Battista Resasco.

staglieno cemetery 1

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

A fine work in the Neoclassical style, the cemetery finally opened in 1851. The art and design of the extension mingled with the realist movement that was developing in the 1850s. An orderly Camposanto layout combined here with the rustic style of Bochetto Irregulars. There were garden paths, fountains, tombs, marble slabs decorated with inscriptions, sculpted figures and a reproduction of the Pantheon of Rome. A quadrangular structure surmounted by arches and monuments resulted in this central pantheon. Amidst this imposing landscape, sculptures by Leonardo Bistolfi and Eugenio Baroni adorn the gloomy place even today. Its living statues of the deceased have gained a reputation as ‘talking statues’ over time.

A popular attraction here is the statue of a nut-seller named Caterina Campodonico, depicted exactly as she was in life. The seller saved all his money for a grand tombstone in the Stagliano cemetery, and is now remembered holding a string of walnuts. Other graves in the cemetery are those of Oscar Wilde’s wife Constance Lloyd, Fabrizio De Andre, Nino Bixio and Giuseppe Mazzini. There is now also a British and Jewish cemetery on the grounds. The former is populated with the graves of Commonwealth soldiers. A memorial to the fall of World War I was added after the war’s passage.

staglieno cemetery 3

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

The cemetery soon became a tourist destination full of guided tours and curious travelers. Being buried here was a status symbol and an attraction to visit. Mark Twain found it worth mentioning in his 1869 book innocent abroad. The Appiani family mausoleum by sculptor Demetrio Pernio made its way into the modern world for its “trendy” fashion on Joy Division album covers. The statue depicts a family mourning on a deathbed. Believe it or not, the cemetery was also Nietzsche’s favorite place for philosophical discourse.

staglieno cemetery 4

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

staglieno cemetery 5

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

staglieno cemetery 6

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

staglieno cemetery 7

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

staglieno cemetery 8

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

staglieno cemetery 9

visual: Sandro Bisotti / Flickr

reference

, Stagliano. commune

, atlas obscura

Source link
Factsbeyond is a website which covers world wide facts. This website will generate the compilation of the facts collected from the other websites. All the information gathered can be traced under this domain. This website is going to be a real help guideline for all the group and ages of people. All the rights are reserved to the content owners and if there comes any denial regarding the copyright by the owner in our website, kindly contact us via email.

Leave a Comment